Senior Pet Care: Compassion and Vigilance

Senior pet care is different than regular pet wellnessThanks to advancements in veterinary medicine, our pets are living longer and healthier lives. Sadly, however, our pets aren’t likely to outlive us altogether. Fortunately, by working together, we can help our pets age as gracefully as possible while maintaining a high quality of life. Although the way forward isn’t always easy or without complications, you can count on our team to provide you with complete and compassionate senior pet care.

Senior Pet Care

It’s easy to forget that by the age of 7, many pets are considered senior. Animals age much faster than humans, so depending on your pet’s species, breed, and genetics, it’s a good idea to increase the frequency of wellness exams once they enter the golden years. From age 1 to 6, we recommend annual appointments. Beginning at age 7, we’d like to see your pet 2 to 3 times a year. Continue…

What You Need to Know About Snake Safety and Pets

Dog approaching snake on tree stumpA snake is something we all hope our pets will never encounter, but, unfortunately in Texas, most of us have run across a snake or two. Snake bites are painful and some are also extremely harmful to our pets.

With over 105 snake species in Texas, it’s important to understand which snakes are a risk, where they tend to live, and how to help your pet avoid an encounter. That’s why Ten West Bird and Animal Hospital has compiled a list of things to watch for when it comes to snake safety and pets.

Friend or Foe?

What’s slithering around in our neck of the woods? In Texas, we really only need to know about the two types of venomous snakes that live here:

Pit vipers – Pit vipers are venomous snakes that have an opening on each side of the head, between the eye and the nostril. There are three types of pit vipers in Texas: copperheads, cottonmouths (water moccasins), and rattlesnakes (Texas has 8 subspecies of rattlesnake).

Coral snakes – Coral snakes are highly poisonous, but also shyer than pit vipers. You can recognize them by their red, yellow, and black bands (the yellow and red bands always touch). Continue…

From Exhaustion and Stress to Full-Blown Heat Stroke in Pets

Heat stroke in pets is a true pet emergency.Whether it’s scheduling a dentist appointment or calling the pest control company, we all need reminders from time to time. However, when it comes to the rising temps of Texas summers, no one can afford to forget the importance of staying cool.

Unfortunately, pets don’t have the luxury of making adjustments for their own comfort. Instead, they rely on us to protect their safety and wellbeing. Let the experts at Ten West Bird and Animal Hospital offer up some tips to prevent heat stroke in pets this summer.

For Your Consideration

Heat stroke in pets can sneak up on you, which is why (among other reasons) it’s critical to know the signs. Animals accustomed to playing or exercising outdoors have to scale back their efforts, but all animals are susceptible to the effects of being in direct sunlight. Brachycephalic breeds (i.e., flat-faced), senior pets, kittens/puppies, overweight/obese animals, and ailing pets are all at higher risk. Continue…